Do Cats Remember Things? A Cat’s Unique Memory

Do Cats Remember Things? Discover What Makes a Cat’s Memory Unique

A lot of people assume cats simply don’t have any kind of long term memory, but that is not a fact. They pay close attention to everything we do and create maps in their brains. It may not be the same kind of memory we have, but they do have it. They create strong impressions with their highly tuned senses of hearing, smelling, and seeing. Indeed, cats remember things.

What Kinds of Learners Are Cats?

Cats hunt alone in the wild. They stalk their prey for a long time before they make a kill. Their means are very sophisticated. They instinctually measure their prey, the direction of the wind, and many other factors that assure their target is captured. The cat family is among the best hunters of the entire animal kingdom. They are highly intelligent and fine tuned in this area.

They learn by observation and copying others. This starts from their earliest days with their mom. They learn how to groom themselves from her. This is one way that memory is strongly impacted in cats. They can essentially learn tricks through observation.

What Does The Research Say?

Research indicates that cats have a memory comparable to a 3-year-old child and have an approximately 16-hour short term memory span. Studies have proven that cats can perform complex problems like puzzles and mazes, too.

Long term memory, as research has indicated, is proven by cats who bond with their people. Many cats have demonstrated recognition of a person who was their affectionate companion previously. When they have reunited again with their owner/companion they often display affection.

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Similarly, they show sadness and anxiety when their human companion leaves their company. They may urinate in strange places and scratch and destroy things. Statistics show this happens more in older than younger cats. Conversely and sadly, they also remember the humans who abuse them. That’s why it takes some time to form trust with some cats we adopt.

In conclusion, the most applicable principle to this knowledge you’ve gained about cat memory is an association of pain or pleasure with certain circumstances, places, and people. If you want. Associative memory, for example, is why they freak out when you try to put them in the car to go to the vet. Also punishing them for doing some mischief may not be understood by them.

 

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